Recently Experian (one of 3 credit bureaus) was hacked with 143 million consumer credit files possibly compromised. You may have received a notice to check to see if yours was one of them. Even if it does not now appear as your information was hijacked, that does not mean your information could not be hacked in the future.
Minnesota and other states have “security freeze” laws. Because of the high demand on the credit bureaus’ websites to freeze credit files (recently some crashed), I recommend sending the credit bureaus a letter. The law allows a $5 charge for each letter, but the $15 for the protection at the 3 credit bureaus is comparatively cheap protection against an Equifax type breach.

Go to consumersunion.org/pdf/security/securityMN.pdf for instructions and a sample letter.

When such a potential lender tries to get your credit report for a hacker, your files will be frozen and will keep them out. If you need to get a loan or credit line, you will have to unfreeze your credit file at the credit bureau the lender uses, but you can refreeze your file after that for just $5. However, you undo the freeze only when YOU need it.

While freezing your credit bureau files is not full identity theft protection, it is a good start. It prevents a hacker from using your data to apply for a loan or credit card in your name.